Posts Tagged ‘electronic noses’

Posted: January 5, 2013 by Wildcat in Uncategorized
Tags: , ,

The concept of e-noses – electronic devices which mimic the olfactory systems of mammals and insects – is very intriguing to researchers involved in building better, cheaper and smaller sensor devices (read more: “Nanotechnology electronic noses”). Less well known is the fact that equivalent artificial sensors for taste – electronic tongues – are capable of recognizing dissolved substances (see for instance: “Electronic tongue identifies cava wines”). Conventional electronic tongues utilize pattern recognition for analysis using arrays of synthetic materials such as polymers, artificial membranes and semiconductors, for applications in the food and beverage industries. “Even with current technological advances, e-tongue approaches still cannot mimic the biological features of the human tongue with regard to identifying elusive analytes in complex mixtures, such as food and beverage products,” Tai Hyun Park, a professor in the School of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Seoul National University, tells Nanowerk. Park, together with Professor Jyongsik Jang and their collaborators, have now developed a human bitter-taste receptor as a nanobioelectronic tongue. Reporting their work in a recent issue of Nano Letters (“Human Taste Receptor-Functionalized Field Effect Transistor as a Human-Like Nanobioelectronic Tongue”), they utilized a human taste receptor as a sensing element for mimicking the human taste system and selective detection. (via Researchers develop a human-like nanobioelectronic tongue)