Archive for the ‘Cybernetics’ Category

Igor Nikolic graduated in 2009 on his dissertation: co-evolutionary process for modelling large scale socio-technical systems evolution. He received his MSc as a chemical– and bioprocess engineer at the Delft University of Technology. He spent several years as an environmental researcher and consultant at University of Leiden where he worked on life cycle analysis and industrial ecology. In his research he specializes in applying complex adaptive systems theory and agent based modeling.

TEDxRotterdam – Igor Nikolic – Complex adaptive systems

On TEDxRotterdam Igor Nikolic left the audience in awe with his stunning presentation and visualizations, mapping complex systems.

Seth Llyod is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT. His talk, “Programming the Universe”, is about the computational power of atoms, electrons, and elementary particles.

A highly recommended watch.

Brute computing force alone can’t solve the world’s problems. Data mining innovator Shyam Sankar explains why solving big problems (like catching terrorists or identifying huge hidden trends) is not a question of finding the right algorithm, but rather the right symbiotic relationship between computation and human creativity.

An advocate of human-computer symbiosis, Shyam Sankar looks for clues in big and disparate data sets.

Robin Hanson predicts what the extraordinary society of the future will look like when emulated minds are ushered in.

Robin Hanson: Extraordinary Society of Emulated Minds – FORA.tv.

Comes highly recommended

Robert Hanson, Associate Professor of Economics at George Mason University, speculates on how systems of class might operate between artificially intelligent machines. Speed and efficiency would be most rewarded, in Hanson’s view, while interaction skills with humans would be least valued.

Does the brain’s wiring make us who we are?
Neuroscientists Sebastian Seung and Anothony Movshon debate minds, maps, and the future of their field.

Moderated by Robert Krulwich and Carl Zimmer
Introduction by Stuart Firestein

Columbia University
April 2, 2012

A highly recommended and important debate

Hosted by Neuwrite

Who (and what) can you trust?
Robots Have Feelings, Too

People are fidgety – they’re moving all the time. So how could the team truly zero-in on the cues that mattered? This is where Nexi comes in. Nexi is a humanoid social robot that afforded the team an important benefit – they could control all its movements perfectly. In a second experiment, the team had research participants converse with Nexi for 10 minutes, much like they did with another person in the first experiment. While conversing with the participants, Nexi — operated remotely by researchers — either expressed cues that were considered less than trustworthy or expressed similar, but non-trust-related cues. Confirming their theory, the team found that participants exposed to Nexi’s untrustworthy cues intuited that Nexi was likely to cheat them and adjusted their financial decisions accordingly. “Certain nonverbal gestures trigger emotional reactions we’re not consciously aware of, and these reactions are enormously important for understanding how interpersonal relationships develop,” said Frank. (source: EurekaAlert)

“The fact that a robot can trigger the same reactions confirms the mechanistic nature of many of the forces that influence human interaction.”

Brute computing force alone can’t solve the world’s problems. Data mining innovator Shyam Sankar explains why solving big problems (like catching terrorists or identifying huge hidden trends) is not a question of finding the right algorithm, but rather the right symbiotic relationship between computation and human creativity.

An advocate of human-computer symbiosis, Shyam Sankar looks for clues in big and disparate data sets.