Archive for the ‘Bioethics’ Category

“This house wants to defeat ageing entirely”
Dr Aubrey de Grey (proposing) and Professor Colin Blakemore (opposing)

Follow the link for the second part

A public debate organized by Oxford University Science Society, held in the Sheldonian Theatre in Oxford on April 25th, 2012.

Highly recommended

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The year is 2032. You have just celebrated your 80th birthday and you have some tough decisions ahead. You can either keep repairing your current body or move into a new one. The growing of “blank” bodies has become all the rage, and by using your own genetic material, body farmers can even recreate your own face at age 20. In just 20 years, this is an industry that has moved from the equivalent of Frankenstein’s laboratory to the new celebrity craze, with controversy following it every step of the way. The combination of a few high profile “accidents” along the way, coupled with those in the religious community who claim that body farmers are playing God, and asking “where does our soul reside?” has given it thousands of top media headlines around the world. Every person on the planet has a different opinion about this moral dilemma, or whether its safe or dangerous, or whether we should just get better at repairing our existing bodies. As medical advances continue, and we devise an entirely new range of health-enhancing options, I propose we set a new standard, raising the bar to the highest possible level. I propose we put an end to human death.  

Keep on reading..
Via www.futuristspeaker.com

Professor Jamie Davies, Professor of Experimental Anatomy, presents “Synthetic Biology: the potential and the problems of re-engineering life”.

Where does morality come from — physically, in the brain? In this talk neuroeconomist Paul Zak shows why he believes oxytocin (he calls it “the moral molecule”) is responsible for trust, empathy, and other feelings that help build a stable society.

Paul Zak
A pioneer in the field of neuroeconomics, Paul Zak is uncovering how the hormone oxytocin promotes trust, and proving that love is good for business.

Steven Pinker is the Harvard College Professor and Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard University.

Drawing from psychology, history, brain science, war studies, game theory, complexity theory, and popular culture, Dr. Pinker explores where violence comes from, why it has been so common over the course of history, and how we have been slowly bringing it under control.

Does your sense of fairness depend on what you ate for breakfast? Can Prozac influence your judgment of what is right or wrong? How can we encourage people to care about the welfare of others? Molly Crockett’s research addresses these questions. She believes that understanding the brain can enable us to design environments that promote cooperation instead of selfishness.

Molly Crockett studies the neurobiology of morality and altruism. Her research has taken her far from her native Southern California, where she studied psychology as an undergraduate at the University of California, Los Angeles. Molly’s curiosity about brain chemistry led her to the University of Cambridge, where she completed her PhD in neuroscience as a Gates Scholar. Now she collaborates with economists at the University of Zürich and neuroscientists at University College London. (TEDxZurich 2011)

h\t to Transcurve

Every day there are news reports of new health advice, but how can you know if they’re right? Doctor and epidemiologist Ben Goldacre shows us, at high speed, the ways evidence can be distorted, from the blindingly obvious nutrition claims to the very subtle tricks of the pharmaceutical industry.

Ben Goldacre writes “Bad Science” — unpicking dodgy scientific claims made by scaremongering journalists, dubious government reports, evil pharmaceutical corporations, PR companies and quacks