Archive for the ‘Futuristic Art’ Category

Mass Effect is epic. It’s the product of the best parts of Star Trek, Star Wars, Battlestar Galactica and more with a protagonist who could be the love-child of Picard, Skywalker, and Starbuck. It’s one of the most important pieces of science fiction narrative of our generation. Mass Effect goes so far beyond other fictional universes in ways that you may not have yet realized. It is cosmic in scope and scale.

Well worth reading the full article, great writing from PopBioethics – by Kyle Munkittrick

H.P. Lovecraft, a man “against the world, against life,” refused to assume the universe was good. Out of that refusal crawled the sublime philosophy of Cosmicism – defined thusly:

“There is no recognizable divine presence, such as a god, in the universe, and humans are particularly insignificant in the larger scheme of intergalactic existence, and perhaps are just a small species projecting their own mental idolatries onto the vast cosmos, ever susceptible to being wiped from existence at any moment. This also suggests that the majority of undiscerning humanity are creatures with the same significance as insects in a much greater struggle between greater forces which, due to humanity’s small, visionless and unimportant nature, it does not recognize.”

Archetype by Aaron Sims

Posted: February 15, 2012 by Spaceweaver in AI, Ethics, Futuristic Art, Sci-Fi
Tags: , ,

RL7 is an eight-foot tall combat robot that goes on the run after malfunctioning with vivid memories of once being human. As its creators and the military close in, RL7 battles its way to uncovering the shocking truth behind its mysterious visions and past.

the official page is here

Highly recommended

Stelarc on Art, Augmented Reality,Enhancement, Genetic Sculpting,Bodily Experimentation,Man-Machine Mergers,and the Future of Life

28-06-2011 – Interviewer / Film Guy / Editor – Adam A. Ford
for more about Stelarc
H/T to John Rodrigues

Stelarc:” STRETCHED BETWEEN WHAT IT NEVER WAS AND WHAT IT COULD NEVER BECOME; SUSPENDED BETWEEN THE INWARD PULL OF GRAVITY AND THE OUTWARD THRUST OF INFORMATION, THE BODY RETURNS TO THE TREE, ANXIOUS AND VULNERABLE AFFIRMING ITS PRIMAL ORIGINS, AMPLIFYING ITS OBSLESCENCE. TERMINAL TRAJECTORY IS PLOTTED, AN ELEGANT EXIT IS ASSURED. THE BEGINNING IS RE-ENACTED, THE END IS PROCLAIMED. THE BREEZE IS BLOWING OVER AERODYNAMIC STRETCHED SKIN, THE BODY IS ATTAINING PLANETARY ESCAPE VELOCITY. THE BRAIN IS BURSTING FROM ITS GENETIC CONFINEMENT, HOVERING BETWEEN GRAVITY AND FANTASY, INTUITIVELY.

“Prepared Tree Suspension: Event for Obsolete Body No. 6”, Black Mountain, Canberra 1982.

Daisy Ginsberg, designer, artist and writer, explores the social, ethical and cultural implications of emerging technologies, especially synthetic biology. Her projects open up a creative space to imagine the potential scientific triumphs and disasters on the horizon.

Daisy Ginsberg: Synthetic aesthetics from PopTech on Vimeo.

more at Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg site

An intriguing combination of programmers, artists, and philosophers, these creators embrace a process that delegates essential decisions to computers, data sets, or even random variables. This allows important metaphors to arise in their work, calling attention to the relationship between humans and the computers that surround us, the mountains of information we generate, and the powerful impact that technology has on our relationships with each other.

Featuring:

Luke Dubois, Generative Composer
Scott Draves, Generative Artist
Will Wright, Game Designer

Music by:

Codex Machine, http://soundcloud.com/ms-codex
Luke Dubois, http://lukedubois.com
Revolution Void, http://www.jamendo.com/en/artist/revolutionvoid
Tryad, http://tryad.org
Reno Project, http://www.jamendo.com/en/artist/Reno_Project

MIT researcher Skylar Tibbits works on self-assembly — the idea that instead of building something (a chair, a skyscraper), we can create materials that build themselves, much the way a strand of DNA zips itself together. It’s a big concept at early stages; Tibbits shows us three in-the-lab projects that hint at what a self-assembling future might look like.

Architect Neri Oxman is the founder of MATERIALECOLOGY, an interdisciplinary design initiative expanding the boundaries of computational form-generation and material engineering. Named one of Fast Company’s “100 Most Creative People in Business,” Oxman investigates the material and performance of nature in an effort to define form itself.