Posted: June 7, 2012 by Wildcat in Uncategorized
Tags: , ,

Carlos Gonzalez stands out from an athletic group gathered on a grassy field at the UCSF Mission Bay campus. The gregarious 32-year-old sports a stylish fauxhawk and walks with a confident yet understated swagger. He’s training to become a mixed martial arts (MMA) fighter. The group looks like a slice of the Bay Area: a multiracial gathering – white, black, Latino, Asian, biracial – of men and women in their early 20s to late 40s. As diverse as they are, they came together one recent spring afternoon for a common purpose: to participate in UCSF’s Amputee Comprehensive Training (ACT) program at the Orthopaedic Institute, to push themselves further than they had ever imagined possible. They came together because they are bonded by a singular experience: all have lost a leg and are learning to push physical boundaries with the help of state-of-the-art artificial limbs. Some lost their legs early in life due to birth defects. Others lost them later in life, after cancer, motor vehicle accidents or life-threatening bacterial infections robbed them of a limb. (via Unique clinic helps amputee athletes push physical boundaries (6/7/2012))

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